The beautiful 'Bumbee' tied by PRO-team member Paul Little is today's 'Fly Friday'!

Tyed on the Partridge CS10/3 size 2, this hook, known as the Bartleet Blind eye is a dublin bend, dropped-point, medium-weight long-shank classic blind-eyed iron hook. 

'The Bumbee' is described as a simple strip wing pattern. The wing of bronze Mallard is best mounted by retaining the stems on the feather for support during the mounting process. The technique as with a lot of delicate feathers is to make a soft loop of unwaxed tying thread around the Mallard and returning the thread underneath the hook shank, pull the tying thread slowly, allowing the feather fibres to "go where they want to". Gently tighten the thread at the last moment to set the wing. Each side is mounted separately during the process. The stems are finally removed after applying two or three turns of waxed thread. A small neat head should be the goal and applying two or three coats of varnish will achieve the head in the photograph.

Paul has tyed the 'Bumbee' using the following materials:

Hook: Partridge CS10/3 size 2
Tag: Oval silver tinsel
Tail: A tuft of scarlet wool
Body: Orange Berlin wool for the first third remainder black Berlin wool
Rib: Oval silver tinsel
Throat: A cochybondhu hackle
Wing: Brown Mallard strips (set horizontally)

 

 

 

Paul Little has given both Salmon and Trout fly workshops in both the US and the UK. He has a great passion for Pike fishing in the Lake District as well as dressing salmon flies. Paul most enjoys dressing grubs, Spey flies and the flies that most people have forgotten.

Paul Little

Pike fishing in the English Lake District was and still is a great passion I have. Fly dressing began in those early years with the necessity to dress small Stoats tail tube flies fished in conjunction with an artificial lure to catch pike. Natural progressions followed into fly fishing and hence fly dressing for both trout and salmon. An article by Oliver Edwards titled “The quest for perfection” published in Trout and Salmon after he won the “Fly tier of the year” competition two years running was inspirational.

It was a chance meeting in 1996 at one of those enjoyable Partridge fly tying days with a fly dresser that turned my fly dressing and life on its head once again, Marvin Nolte. I owe a great debt of gratitude to Marvin. The world of classic salmon flies beckoned. My early attempts at this fine art demonstrated that my knowledge of materials and how they behaved in hand was sadly lacking. Books were a great source of advice but they only went so far. I was once again to turn to that same fly dresser whom I met earlier that year. Early examples of my flies (which I still possess) were critiqued in the gentlest manner so as not to discourage, techniques were revealed that were to make vast improvements to my flies. My passion is for dressing salmon flies, the classics. I most enjoy dressing the grubs, Spey flies and those flies that most people have forgotten.

In recent years I have given both salmon and trout fly workshops in the US and the UK and enjoy the experience very much. The important thing to me is mastering the basic techniques and having done so, to disseminate those skills for the benefit of other Flydressers.